Baret Yoshida Rear Naked Choke Drill on Baseball Bat

Jiu Jitsu and Submission Grappling Coach Baret Yoshida has another cool drill you can do to practice your rear naked chokes at home with a baseball bat. Give it a try.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Baret Yoshida:
So I’m going to do the rear naked choke, okay? So what I’m doing, I’m going to get the fat end, I’m going to put it on the mat, and I’m going to put my foot underneath the bat here and trap my leg over here. So this’ll keep the bat nice sturdy, right? And then what I’ll do is I’ll get my hand on the back of the handle here, and I’m going to come around and just simulate the rear naked choke here, right? So from here, you lock your hands in and you’re going to actually pull your elbows into your body, keeping the bat straight with your legs as well, so it doesn’t slide away. And you can bring your head here. Squeeze it in, something like that. And you can practice on both your arms.

So once again, I get one of my feet here, put it underneath the fat end of the bat. Your leg will cross around to keep this bat sturdy. And then I’m going to get one hand on the handle and the other half comes around. And when I get my hand around here I want my elbow to go as close to the bat as possible here. You don’t want big gaps here. Something like this, just to really simulate a rear naked choke. And I bring my head on the other side of my hand here, putting pressure something like so, and pull my elbows in. You can do it on both sides. And you can do this while you watch TV or you don’t need much space. You can just …

Baret Yoshida Guillotine Drill with a Baseball Bat

Baret Yoshida is a Jiu Jitsu and Grappling master and one creative guy as well. Check out how he uses a baseball bat to practice his guillotines when he’s at home by himself.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Baret Yoshida:

 

So, I’m going to show some techniques that you can do training alone with just a bat, or a stick, or even a pipe, whatever you can find. This one here is the guillotine. So, I’m going to have the fat end facing towards me. I’m going to put my foot underneath the end of the handle, on the inside like this, and then the other foot goes upon it here like this. Okay?

From there, I’m going to wrap my arm around like I’m doing the guillotine. Set. When you get your arm around here, today, I’m going to pull it all the way to the joint here. But, as far as the gripping here, I could grab my pinky here, I could go with a Gable Grip here, or even an S-grip. So, those are probably the three main grips that I’m going to practice with. Okay?

So, I’m going to get my foot, bring my leg over, and grab one of my grips here. Okay? And then, from there, we’re going to just lean back here. And, you can really, really press into it here. You’re going to feel a lot of pressure in your arm. It’s going to feel very, very similar to doing an actual guillotine.

All right, so using the fat part facing you, I bring the foot under, the other leg goes over, almost like an X here, and the hand comes around. And, like I said, pinky, S-grip or Gable, and break, fall back here, and just really, really twist it through here.

Barety Yoshida Solo BJJ Drill with Gi Jacket

Here’s another cool Jiu Jitsu drill from Coach Baret Yoshida you can do at home by yourself with just your gi jacket. Get creative and try some other movements too.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Baret Yoshida:
Hey guys, I know the gym’s been closed. Here are a few drills you can do by yourself for just a gi top. This next drill is the kneading your feet drill. So I use this drill for coordination and you can make this harder or easier on yourself depending. Once again, I’m going to start with both feet in the sleeves. I’m going to bring these sleeves together and hold them together in one hand. From here what I do is I keep tension with both feet. I remove one foot, I put it on the top. Then I take the other one out and I put it on top as well. When you do this, you need to keep tension. From here you can re move afoot and come on the bottom. Like I said, you make it easier or harder dependent on where we hold the sleeves.

I can hold them closer or farther. If you have trouble, you can hold them a little farther out here, but I like to pull them as close as possible here. I bring my foot in, keep tension. Then I bring the other foot in, keep tension. Now from here, we just keep doing this concurrently outside, outside, inside, inside. To really knead the feet in there. You want to make it easier, you can go a little wider.

This next drill is the outside knee inside knee drill. I’m going to put both feet inside the lapels like so. I’m going to cross step a foot over. I’m going to pull inwards with my outside knee. Then I’m going to push back up, putting my right foot inside the sleeve here, and then I pull in the inside knee. Then I push back up and both feet will be on one sleeve and I cross that. From here we can go in through the outside knee by pulling both feet in, push up. Then you bring your inside knee and you push up. They’re crossed, outside knee. Push up, inside knee, cross, outside knee, push up, inside knee, cross. So guys, keep training. We’ll be back to the gym soon and thank you for all the support.

Baret Yoshida Armbar to Triangle Drill Using Gi Jacket

In this video Jiu Jitsu Coach Baret Yoshida has another cool drill you can do at home using just your gi jacket. This one is his armbar to triangle drill. Give it a try and make sure to keep training whatever way you can.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Baret Yoshida:
Hey guys. I know the gym’s been closed. Here are a few drills you can do by yourself with just a gi top. This next drill is my favorite one. It’s the spider to arm bar to triangle drill. Start off this drill keeping tension on the sleeves like so. And what I’m going to do here is I’m going to take a foot out, lasso around. I’m going to step on the collar, bring the leg over like in arm bar, pull in the sleeves together. And then from here, I’m going to pull the sleeve outwards, bring my knee in, and my leg’s going to shoot through here like I’m going to do a triangle. I’m going to lock it all the way tight here. From here, I wrap the sleeve around my knee, make some tension. That way I can get my other foot back on the sleeve to push it back up. And then we can start back to the beginning.

So you lasso around, step on the collar, pull the sleeves together, and we bring the leg over like in arm bar. From here, I’m going to push the collar. My leg’s going to come through, lock my triangle nice and deep. And to get tension here, I wrap the sleeve around my knee. Make some space so I can get my heel back on that sleeve. I can match the feet off and we can start from the beginning.

Lasso on the collar, arm bar, leg inside here, triangle, wrap around the knee, step, step, and start from the beginning.

So guys, keep training. We’ll be back to the gym soon. And thank you for all the support.

Baret Yoshida’s Solo Spider Guard Drills

While we’re all stuck at home, Jiu Jitsu Coach Baret Yoshida has some cool drills you can do by yourself using your gi jacket. It’s important to keep moving and stay sharp so you’re ready for action when the gym opens back up.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Baret Yoshida:
Hey, guys. I know the gym has been closed. Here are a few drills you can do by yourself with just a gi. This drill is the spider stick drill. I’m going to start off with a pistol grip, and the way you do that is, I’m going to put my thumbs inside the sleeves here and I’m just going to grasp on both sides of this. With the spider sleeves, I bring one foot under the other and I bring in a little bit higher than what I would do for the normal sweep here. Just because there’s not enough tension. Because there’s no person in here, right. So I bring this in here. I bring my knees in, load them up here, put them back through my knees and load them up here.

This drill is the spider cross grip outside knee drill. And then what I’m do is I’m going to cross one foot over and what I do is I pull my knees in and I put my outside knee inside the sleeve. From here I push back up, return both feet and then I crossed the other one over. Pulling my knees in and I put the other knee in the outside sleeve.

So guys, keep training. We’ll be back to the gym soon and thank you for all the support.

Baret Yoshida Solo Armbar Drills Using Your Gi

For this drill all you’ll need is your gi jacket, and Jiu Jitsu Coach Baret Yoshida will show you how you can practice your armbars at home all by yourself. Give it a try and keep your movements sharp.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Baret Yoshida:
Hey guys, I know the gym’s been closed. Here are a few drills you can do by yourself with just a Gi top. This drill is the spider armbar drill. And to this drill, I’m going to use the pistol grips. So I put my thumbs inside the sleeves like so.

We’re going to start off with the feet in the sleeves, and then I’m going to lasso foot over. And for this one I will step on top of the collar here, like so, then I bring the other leg over, I pull both sleeves together, like I’m doing an armbar and I bring the leg over the top to cross, and dip my hips. Right, so from there I put the foot back in the sleeve, return back to both sleeves. So what you do is you take a foot out, you lasso over, you put the foot in the collar, you pull both sleeves together as you remove the other foot. Cross the leg over, make sure to bend your knees here, keep tension, keep those sleeves together. You can lift your hips here. Then from there, we put the foot back in the sleeves, and we go back to the starting position.

This next drill is the spider armbar drill, the second version. So I take the leg out, I come around and this time I hook, with my toes underneath, the opposite sleeve. Then I remove my foot, I pull both sleeves together, bring the leg over, and then what I do is I use my sleeve. I use my knee here, I wrap around the knee, get my foot back in. I return back to the starting point.

So guys, keep training. We’ll be back to the gym soon, and thank you for all the support.

Finishing an Armbar When Your Opponent Grabs His Lapel

A common defense to the armbar is to grab your lapel and hold on for dear life. Jiu Jitsu Coach Ryan Fortin has a tip to show you a way to break this grip and finish the armbar.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Ryan Fortin:
How’s it going everybody? It’s coach Ryan Fortin here with The Arena, and this would be your tip of the week. This is something that I do to help me get the arm when I’m trying to get an armbar and they’re hanging onto the lapel. So here I am, armbar position, right? My arms are in like this. I’m controlling the arm, and I’m holding onto the leg so he doesn’t bridge. And I want to get this arm right, but he’s hanging on to his lapel, which is a good defense because that allows their free arm to be able to do other stuff with it, right?

 

So what I’m going to do is, I’m going to let go of this pant grip here, right? And I’m going to grab the same lapel that he’s grabbing just low. And then I’m going to stick my heel and just like this, and watch my heels in it and I’m holding on this side, I’ll use my foot to push away, and then as I’m leaning back, that’s how I’ll break the grip. And then I’ll find the thumb and finish the armbar. Once again, we’re in an armbar position. The guy’s holding onto his lapel. I’m trying to find a way to break that grip, okay. I’m going to get my foot, I’m going to get it right inside that lapel. Grab beneath it, kick it to break it free, and then find the thumb. I hope that helps you get some more armbars.

Is Your Ego Preventing You from Growing in Martial Arts?

Switching things up in this Tip of the Week, MMA Coach Charles Martinez discusses something that can hold any athlete back. Your ego. Your ego can really limit your ability to step outside of your comfort zone and learn new skills, so listen up closely to what Coach Charles has to say.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Charles Martinez:
Hey, this Coach Charles Martinez from The Arena, and this tip of the week slightly different than what I normally put out. I’m always really focused on technique, but today I decided to talk about how to actually make growth in the sports, right? All of these sports have a similar thing. You’re trying to learn new technique, you’re trying to add to the technique and then you have to do it under pressure.

A lot of times what prevent us from getting better really is our ego. Our ego doesn’t want someone to best you. You want to go harder and harder, and you want to make sure that you win every exchange. That’s not always the best way of being, right? You want to make sure that your technique is getting better. In order for your technique to get better, sometimes you have to do it against people that are better than you. They’re going to get the better of you, and then you have to try to analyze what’s working, what isn’t working, especially with sparring and live rolling.

People are going to get the better of you, and there’s always that, “Well, he started it. That’s why I started going so hard.” That’s the most common thing I’ve heard. I’ve heard guys in the fight team say it all the time. “Well, he started it.” Well, just cause you can do something to him doesn’t mean that you should. Right? There’s varying skill levels. You can learn from each level of someone better than you or worse than you, depending on how you take the lessons.

If you want to smash and smash and smash, that’s fine, but eventually someone will smash you and it limits your growth, right? Yes, you want to practice your technique perfectly, but you shouldn’t see someone getting the better of you as a failure. You should see as an opportunity to analyze what you’re doing, and see why they were able to get the better of you rather than seeing it as a bruise to your ego or a challenge to your manhood. It should really just be taken as a lesson. They got the better of me. Now, let me see why and let’s see what changes I can make to make my technique better so I don’t have to just use brute force or speed in order to win. That’s your tip of the week.

Options to Sweep and Take the Back from Deep De La Riva Guard

If you’re having any trouble coming up with options from the De La Riva guard, then check out what Jiu Jitsu Coach Ryan Fortin likes to do from there. Here he shows some sweeping and back taking options you can try out.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Coach Ryan Fortin:
Hey guys, what’s up? Ryan Fortin here, Jiu Jitsu coach at the Arena with this week’s tip. Harry, one of our purple belts had a question. What was it Harry?

 

Harry:

Yeah, I was looking for, once I get deep De La Riva, and someone sits down on it, what’s a good sweep from there?

 

Ryan Fortin:
Good way to sweep, okay. So, I’m going to show him a couple of things I like to do. Brian, could I use you. So, I’m playing De La Riva guard. I’m looking to control something. I like the sleeve, personally. I’m using this foot like you said, deep De La Riva, so not here, but all the way to the far hip. Now, let’s say he puts that far knee down. They do this a lot. Hey, what I like to do is I’m going to straighten this leg to cripple his knee. All right?

 

If he leaves his arm long, I’ll lasso this arm and use that to sweep him. All right, so back. If he keeps keeps his elbow tight, I’ll come around and butterfly behind the leg, looking to get pants and then for back takes. So, once we have that De La Riva, straighten that leg and cripple their knee. All right, guys. Hope that helps.

MMA Legend Enson Inoue Teaches His Favorite Way to Mount His Opponent

While teaching one of his seminars here at The Arena, Pride Fight Veteran and MMA Legend Enson Inoue shows his favorite and most effective way to mount his opponent. This technique can also be used in Jiu Jitsu or Submission Grappling.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Enson Inoue:
So I’m here and I sit for the mount. One big point I like to emphasize is you always want something connected to the hips. If it’s your hand, if your hands going to leave, I like my knee there. From here, when I like to mount, is I don’t like to commit my whole body weight. A lot of you guys might know this, but when you spar, you’re still probably doing this type of mount. So, what I mean by that is, when my knee will hit the mat first before my feet. You see how my whole body is committed to it? So what I like to emphasize is, here, when I’m going to mount, it’s just my feet.

I’m real tight, but what I want to imagine is a cockroach. And if you don’t like killing cockroaches then you imagine your ex-girlfriend or your ex-wife. So you just want to give it a little. So you want to do it as possible to the hips if you want to control the hips. So what I like to do is, I like to come here, even if I don’t slap, I hook here.

So right here, my only movement is my leg. And if he were bridged and go back and try to turn it backwards, I can easily base. If I’m here, and my whole body weight is on him, and he bridges, he’s got the momentum of my whole body weight going back. So it’s hard for me to maintain position.

So what I want you guys to do, this basic here. You come here, you’ve got to know your plan. For me, if Baret lifts, and he’s defending, he lifts up here, I know I’m not flexible enough to get that. But I know if I can get it about here, I can probably clear. So you’ve got to know your own plan, and all you need was a split second because the foot is so fast. Okay, so get a partner and let’s just try doing this, okay? Ready, one, two, three.

About The Arena

The Arena is the largest gym in North America for Combat Sports and Martial Arts instruction.

Our Address

3350 Sports Arena Blvd.
San Diego, CA 92110 USA

Free Trial (A) Footer

  • GET YOUR FREE TRIAL YET?